Saturday, January 31, 2015

Cate Beauman - Reagan's Redemption (Author blog post)

Cate Beauman is back with the eight installment in her bestselling romantic suspense series, The Bodyguards of L.A. County.  Reagan’s Redemption is on sale now through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, Kobo, and more! 

 Doctor Reagan Rosner loves her fast-paced life of practicing medicine in New York City’s busiest trauma center. Kind and confident, she’s taking her profession by storm—until a young girl’s accidental death leaves her shaken to her core. With her life a mess and her future uncertain, Reagan accepts a position as Head Physician for The Appalachia Project, an outreach program working with some of America’s poorest citizens.

Shane Harper, Ethan Cooke Security’s newest team member, has been assigned a three-month stint deep in the mountains of Eastern Kentucky, and he’s not too happy about it. Guarding a pill safe in the middle of nowhere is boring as hell, but when he gets a look at his new roommate, the gorgeous Doctor Rosner, things start looking up.

Shane and Reagan encounter more than a few mishaps as they struggle to gain the trust of a reluctant community. They’re just starting to make headway when a man’s routine checkup exposes troubling secrets the town will do anything to keep hidden—even if that means murder.

Read an excerpt from Reagan’s Redemption:

The front door opened and closed. “Shane?”
“Down here.”
Reagan hurried in, her eyes full of excitement. “How are things going?”
“Good. Faith is clean, eating, and will hopefully be sleeping in the next couple of minutes.”
“I can take a turn. I know I’ve been gone for awhile.”
He shook his head. “We’re fine. Looks like you’ve had a run today.”
She smiled. “Two patients—one ear infection and a strep throat.”
“Good stuff.”
She nodded, sitting on the edge of the mattress. “That’s not the best part. I was talking with Jodi, Josiah’s mother, about her gardens—trying to break the ice a little. She was telling me how she grows some of the best corn around but constantly has trouble with her beans. Apparently, Sue Anne’s family seems to have the opposite issue.” She swiped her hair behind her ear. “Anyway, while Jodi was talking, I got this idea. I was thinking we could organize an evening where families can get together here at the clinic and swap fruits and vegetables for a bigger variety of healthful foods—kind of like a farmer’s market. We can offer some simple snacks and drinks, and I’m hoping I might be able to throw in a few nutrition facts while we’re at it. There are so many kiddos with bad teeth. They’re drinking too much soda.”
“Sounds like you’ve got a plan. Go get ‘em, tiger.” He liked seeing her like this—her eyes bright, her hands punctuating certain words as they spilled from her mouth, caught up in her own enthusiasm.
“I will.” Her smile dimmed as she touched Faith’s toes peeking out from the blanket. “But I don’t know how many people will come.”
“So you won’t have standing-room only on your first try.”
She licked her lips. “They’re afraid.”
He frowned. “Who?”
“The people here. They’re frightened by either me or the clinic.”
“Why do you say that?”
She shrugged. “I don’t know. That was the sense I got when I spoke with Jenny’s mother and then again with Jodi.”
He remembered Mrs. Hendley’s weird spewings about heeding warnings and staying away, but she also seemed like a bit of a whack job. “I don’t know, Doc. When I look at you ‘intimidating’ isn’t exactly the first word that comes to mind.”
“Maybe not to you, but they were certainly uneasy. Maybe I’m trying to make sense of an unusual situation, but I don’t think so. Both women kept looking toward the trees, like they were being watched or something.” She shuddered. “It gave me the willies.”
“We’ll keep an eye on the situation, but things have been pretty low key so far.”
She nodded. “I just really want this to work. I can help this town if they’ll let me.”

Did you enjoy the excerpt?  You can read the first chapter on my website,

The Inspiration Behind Reagan’s Redemption:

     I’ve wanted to tell Reagan and Shane’s story for quite a while now, but I kept putting it off, knowing where the weeks of research would take me. Reagan Rosner is a doctor, which is great for her but not so much for me as the writer. Unfortunately, I’m a bit of a hypochondriac who is afflicted with White Coat Syndrome. Typically, I stay as far away from anything “medical” as possible, but for Reagan’s Redemption I had to dig deep and conquer a personal demon or two. There were many days where I cringed, watching how-to videos on IV insertions and blood draws and hyperventilated my way through more than one resuscitation tutorial, but I did it, making Reagan’s character all the more stronger for it.

     After the days of dreadful research, I really knuckled down and got to work. I had so much fun with this story. Reagan is kind and dedicated and Shane extremely funny. This couple complements each other well, which is perfect because they’ll face more than their fair share of trouble in Black Bear Gap, Kentucky.

     I hope you enjoy Reagan and Shane as much as I enjoyed writing them!

     ~ Cate

The Unofficial Reagan’s Redemption Soundtrack

     Here are a few of the songs that I had on “repeat” while I created Reagan and Shane’s story!  You can listen to them on my website

The soundtrack, of sorts, for Reagan’s Redemption:

  •  Devil Town by Tony Lucca 
  •  So Easy by Phillip Phillips 
  •  Not A Bad Thing by Justin Timberlake
  •  Science and Faith by The Script
  •  Daylight by Maroon Five
  •  Hazy by Rosi Golan ft. William Fitzimmons
  •  Get Out by Casey Abrams
  •  First Flight Home by Jake Miller 
  •  Human by Jon McLaughlin
  •  Have A Little Faith In Me by Jewel
  •  Thinking Out Loud by Ed Sheeran
  •  Parachute by Train

About the author:

      Cate currently lives in North Carolina with her husband, their two boys, and St. Bernard’s, Bear and Jack. She is the author of the best-selling romantic suspense series, The Bodyguards of L.A. County.  Before her career as an author, Cate worked in special education for 12 years.

     “I’m a pretty lucky girl; one day I woke up and my entire life changed. I saw the light, so to speak, and decided I was going to be a writer. Now, five years later, I’m working on my ninth novel, Answers For Julie, which I plan to release during the summer of 2015.  I’m remain so very grateful for the support and success that I have had.  Thank you!”  - Cate


E-Book Giveaway Contest

Thanks for stopping by and chatting with us Cate.  Reagan's Redemption is the first book I've ever read by you and I'm in love with Reagan and Shane.  I can't wait to catch up with the other books in the series.

Readers, Cate has TWO contests going on right now.  The first contest is for an ebook copy of Reagan's Redemption! There will be 6 winners.  You really have to get your name in on this one, it's an excellent book.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

 The second is for a set of Swarovski crystal jewelry that ends on FEBRUARY 5th!  It's absolutely gorgeous. Hurry and get your entries in!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Contact Cate

Amazon Author Page

Social links:
Twitter: @CateBeauman

Do You Have Time to Kill? by Jamie Hill (Author blog post)

My latest romantic suspense novel is now available at Amazon and will be in print in a few weeks. Time To Kill is book 2 in my Witness Security series. 

People seem to either love or hate series work. Readers have told me when they get to the end of a book and discover a cliffhanger, they sigh and do some quick research to find out if the book is part of series. Some find this disappointing. While I can totally relate to that position, I have my own reasons for preferring series work. (But not cliffhangers. I hate cliffhangers.)

When I finish reading a book I enjoyed, I have trouble leaving that ‘world’. (Similar to watching the last episode of Parenthood this week. I’ve rewatched the ending multiple times and need to erase the silly thing off my DVR so I can move on!) Back to books. Nora Roberts was the first author I read who really did series well, in my humble opinion. For sweet contemporary romance I grew up reading Danielle Steel, but her titles were singles. Nora introduced me to trilogies, where there might be three characters that are connected in some way and they each have their own story to tell. I discovered I loved that method of storytelling. I always wondered what might have happened to characters I enjoyed, and the series method gives me the opportunity to find out.

The first series I authored dealt with three cops who worked together in the Wichita PD. A Cop in the Family was fun because Family Secrets was one of my first novels, and I had a hard time moving on from Jack and Crystal. By writing more books in their world I was able to show what they were doing in later years.

My romance series, The Blame Game, focused on a family and relationships that four members developed over a span of twenty years. That was great fun to write.

Witness Security is set in Topeka, Kansas, at a fictional Witsec office. There will be four books, each telling the story of a different US Marshal working there. Doug Jackson found true love in book 1. His partner Jordan Burke gets her turn in book 2. If you know my writing, you’ll know that I’m not spoiling anything to say I always write happy endings, because that’s what I like to read. How they get there is the fun part.

I’ll continue to write series books because that’s what I love. I promise to always let the reader know up front that the book is part of a series. And I try to make each book stand alone, so you don’t have to read them in order if you stumble upon the second or third book first. But I recommend readers try to read them in order when possible, because that’s the way they were written. Oh—and no cliffhangers. My stories will be complete when you reach ‘The End’. Then you’ll get a peek at what’s to come in the next book. In this case, you can read the beginning of Cover of Darkness, Book 3 in Witness Security

I hope you enjoy reading them as much as I did writing them!

Time To Kill
Witness Security

US Marshal Jordan Burke is happy for her partner when he takes a month off for paternity leave, but she's not happy about her substitute partner. Nick Pierce worked for the Topeka Witsec office years ago and left under less than the best of circumstances. When he’s asked to fill in he hesitates, but curiosity about Jordan makes him accept the job. The minute he sees her again he doesn’t regret his decision. From Atlanta to Los Angeles, Jordan and Nick discover that danger, and help, can come from the strangest sources. While they struggle to protect their witnesses, the bigger challenge seems to be keeping each other alive. And there’s always the possibility that they might kill each other first.

Jamie Hill

Jamie Hill was born and raised in a beautiful, mid-sized town in Midwest, USA. At various times she wanted to be a veterinarian, teacher, cheerleader, TV star or a famous singer. The one thing she always wanted to be was a writer. Starting at about age ten, she penned romance as she envisioned it in one spiral notebook after another.

When she's not working at the day job she loves, Jamie enjoys spending time with her family, reading, and watching movies (the scarier the better!) In her ‘spare time’ she can often be found writing, editing, or doing something more mundane like housework. After that, she's probably taking a nap. She loves to hear from readers, so feel free to drop her a line.

Find more about Jamie at these places online:
Books We Love:

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Why Men Opt Out of the (Women’s) Fiction World by Leonce Gaiter (Author Blog Post)

Fewer and fewer men read fiction.  They compose only about 20% of the fiction market according to surveys. Some lay this off to genetics, suggesting that the way men’s minds work discourages them from entering into another’s experience the way fiction demands.

“Boys and men are, in general, more convergent and linear in their thinking; this would naturally draw them towards non-fiction,” wrote author Darragh McManus, pondering the question.

Others, like Jason Pinter, suggest that the overwhelmingly female publishing industry simply overlooks books that appeal to men because they fall outside the female experience.  In other words, men now suffer the same fate women suffered at the hands of a male-dominated publishing industry for so many years—and payback’s a bitch.

Others suggest that boys are discouraged from reading at a young age by children’s books that fail to engage them.  Give them the proper material, the story goes, and young boys will engage with reading.  They point to the fact that young males were principal consumers of the Harry Potter books as proof.  “More boys than girls have read the Harry Potter novels,” according to U.S. publisher, Scholastic. “What’s more, Harry Potter made more of an impact on boys' reading habits. Sixty-one percent agreed with the statement ‘I didn't read books for fun before reading Harry Potter,’ compared with 41 percent of girls.”

I always balked at these rationales because I read fiction all the time.  However, thinking on it, I had to admit that I avoid modern fiction like the plague.  I have tried the popular plot-thick page-turners and the feel-good tearjerkers and the occasional cause celebre with a literary reputation.  So many have left me so cold, that I simply won’t shell out the cash for a paperback or e-book version, much less a hardcover. 

Trying to assess what I found lacking in most of the current novels I attempt, I find their utter reliance on the world around them (and me) supremely dull.  So many work so hard to place characters in a world I will recognize.  Too many work hard to create characters with which I (or their prime demographic audience) will ‘identify,’ and recognize as someone they could be, or someone they know. 

It then made sense that men would ask why they should read something “made up” about this world when there was plenty of factual reading material on that subject.  I have never approached fiction to re-visit “this world.”  I’m already here.  Instead, I want an alternative—a vision of this world exhaled through the writers’ and characters’ hearts, minds and eyes.  Exhaled with the distinction of the smell of an individual’s breath.  Fitzgerald’s Long Island in The Great Gatsby is his own creation, no kitchen sink recreation.  Fitzgerald’s people and prose warp this place into something utterly unique. 

Raymond Chandler’s Los Angeles is his distinctive projection of that city. You don’t pick up Jim Thompson’s The Killer Inside Me with the idea of identifying with the protagonist.  You don’t grab Faulkner to meet the boys next door or titter with recognition of your kith and kin. You don’t visit Patricia Highsmith to look in a mirror.  You pick them up to enter worlds as fantastical in their way as Harry Potter’s.  I read fiction to meet characters I otherwise would not.  I read fiction for the larger than life—not a retread of this one.  I want to watch and think with characters who are nothing like me, who dare what I never would, who experience in ways that I cannot. 

In an article titled, “Why Women Read More Than Men,” NPR quoted Louann Brizendine, author of The Female Brain suggesting a biological reason why women read more fiction than men:

The research is still in its early stages, but some studies have found that women have more sensitive mirror neurons than men. That might explain why women are drawn to works of fiction, which by definition require the reader to empathize with characters.

What horseshit. Reading, and reading fiction, require no such thing.  They require that you understand and grow intrigued by characters and situations.  You need not imagine yourself as them or believe that they behave as you would.

Perhaps more men stopped reading fiction when fiction stopped presenting unique worlds, and settled for presenting this one so that readers could better “identify.”  Maybe we’re too megalomaniacal to “identify” with that.  We want words recreated, not rehashed. 

“Shall I project a world,” asks Oedipa Maas in Thomas Pynchon’s “The Crying of Lot 49.”  Somewhere along the line, in tandem with the female domination of the publishing industry and fiction readership, the ideal of doing so fell from vogue.  Instead, writers rely on identification with this one.  Male readers seem have checked out.


Leonce Gaiter is a prolific African American writer and proud Harvard Alum. His writing has appeared in the NYTimes, NYT Magazine, LA Times, Washington Times, and Washington Post, and he has written two novels.  His newly released novel, In the Company of Educated Men, ( is a literary thriller with socio-economic, class, and racial themes.
In the company of Educated Men

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Seniors Need Love, Too by Roseanne Dowell (Author Blog Post)

Seniors Need Love, Too by Roseanne Dowell

Yes, that’s right. Romance isn't only for the young. My books often are about older heroes/heroines. Not that I have a problem writing younger characters, I just thought there was a need for books with older ones also. After all I fit into that generation. 

  The idea of Geriatric Rebels first came to me when my father was in a nursing home. Unfortunately, he couldn't get out of bed, but he did refuse to eat or take meds. After years of working as a tile setter, it had taken its toll and he suffered with arthritis in his knees and back, so much so that he wasn't able to stand or walk.

During several visits, I noticed a little old lady walking past his room and always stopping to look in. She never spoke, just looked at us for a minute and went on her way. Something about her reminded me of my mother. Maybe it was her curly, silver hair, or her slight build. Whatever it was, she stuck in my mind and years later when I decided to write this story, she naturally came to mind. This story actually had several different drafts. The original was a nonfiction assignment for a writing course I took. It was strictly about my father and his incapacity to get out of bed. From there it changed to fiction, and I brought Elsa into the story.  While Elsa is based on my mother – especially her love of playing jokes and her sense of humor, my mother predeceased my father by three years. And while Mike is based on my father, my dad didn't have this sense of humor. He was more serious minded. While I could picture my mother doing this stuff, even in a nursing home, I honestly couldn't picture my dad. I think that’s what attracted him to my mother. 
Where I came up with these ideas, I’m not quite sure. I think Mike and Elsa thought of them. The story just took off on its own and flowed. I love when a story does that.

Blurb for Geriatric Rebels

Mike’s in a nursing home/rehab center because he fell and has no one to take care of him. A stubborn, 72 year old, set in his ways, he won’t cooperate with the nurses, refuses to get out of bed or take his medicine. At least he does until he meets Elsa. The tiny, spunky, Elsa sparks new life into him.

Seventy year old, Elsa is left in the home while her son takes a family vacation. She joins forces with Mike, setting the home on its heels. Later they discover deception and fraud.  Will they find happiness together?

Romantic Suspense Author, Gail Roughton says, “Who says life begins at 40? Life is wonderful at any age, as long you're willing to live it. Elsa Logan and Mike Powell prove it. And I want to be just like them when I grow up! One of Roseanne Dowell's best, and my personal favorite! 

Available from Amazon

Roseanne grew up reading first Nancy Drew mysteries and soon moved on to Victoria Holt and Phyllis Whitney. She’s a big fan of Agatha Christie and always loved writing even as a teen, often making up different endings to books, and writing poems.
While working as a school secretary, she decided to take a correspondence course, writing for children. It didn't take long to realize that even though she had six children, it took someone special to write books for them. So, she tried her hand at nonfiction, but didn't care for that either.  That’s when she moved on to romance novels. But they sat in the attic along with her poems and journals.

In 2002 at a Book Club meeting, she confessed regret about not pursuing a career in writing. That’s all it took.  Her friends convinced her it wasn't too late. After giving it some thought, she decided they were right and took another writing course. Within a few months, her first article was published in Good Old Days Magazine. Since then, she’s had several articles published.
In 2006, Roseanne’s first book, Satin Sheets, was published and sold over 35,000 copies. Since then, she’s decided to go the way of the future – E-books.  She writes various types of romance – paranormal, contemporary, mystery and women’s fiction. Her heroines range from their early twenties to late seventies. Yes, seniors need love, too. 

Roseanne lives with her husband of more than fifty years, has six grown children, fourteen grandchildren and several great grandchildren. She spends her time between writing, quilting, and embroidering. She also enjoys blogging, tweeting, face-booking and posting on various writers’ groups and spending time with her family. 

Learn more about Roseanne Dowell’s books,
check out her
or her blog: 
Roseanne's page at Books We Love: 

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

BonAppetit! Fonseca's Fury by Anne Green

A fiery romance novel deserves a flaming cocktail to accompany it and USA Today bestselling author Abby Green’s new tale, FONSECA’S FURY, is no exception. The book has the perfect ingredients for a steamy love story—a Brazilian stud who happens to be a billionaire, a sweet and charitable heroine and a passionate anger that ignites them both. This cocktail is FONSECA’S FURY in liquid form.

The Flaming Fonseca

1 oz. Dark Rum
2 oz. Pineapple Juice
2 oz. Apple Juice
½ oz. Bacardi 151
Gold Cocktail Rim Sugar

Run a lime along the rim of a highball glass and dip into gold cocktail rim sugar to coat. Pour dark rum, pineapple juice and apple juice into the glass and float Bacardi 151 on top and carefully light the top layer using a long match.

Here is a little more about each book.

Fonseca's Fury by Anne Green

It's hot in the jungle ....

The last time Luca Fonseca saw Serena DePiero, he ended up in a jail cell.  The Brazilian billionaire has since clawed back his reputation, but he's never forgotten her.  So when Luca discovers Serena's working for his charity, his anger reignites!

Serena has changed.  Finally in control of her life, she refuses to let Luca intimidate her.  She'll deal with whatever her new boss throws at her - from a rain-forest trek to the social jungle of Rio!  But she can't handle the passion that flares hottern than Luca's Fury.

Especially when it threatens to consume them both!

You can by Fonseca's Fury here

Never Trust A Cowboy

When a Cowboy Comes Calling ...

The last thing harried Lila Flynn needed was another cowboy to deal with.  But new hire Del Fox was different than most sweet-talking wranglers.  The hard worker had a gentle touch and eyes that spoke of a past he didn't share.  Lila soon found her hardened heart softening, frightening her more than any other hurdles she was facing.

Del's assignment in Short Straw, South Dakota, was meant to be fast and simple.  Falling for Lila Flynn, however, had complicated everything.  If he did his job right it would mean destroying everything Lila had worked for.  He'd given her every reason never to trust him again.  But when all was said and done, would she trust their love enough to give them a second chance?

You can buy Never Trust a Cowboy here.

Snowed In With Her Ex

Trapped in a cabin with the man who makes her want what she shouldn't have .....

Wedding photographer Briana Harper never expected to run into her ex at an engagement shoot!  And when a blizzard strands a remote mountain cabin, she knows she's in trouble. She's never forgotten Ian Lawson, but none of reasons they broke up have changed.  He's still a workaholic. And now he's an engaged workaholic!

But Ian is also still a man who knows what he wants. And what he wants is Briana. Untangling the lies of his current engagement leaves him free to ... indulge. Yet proving he's changed may be this music moguls toughest negotiation yet...

Wednesday, January 07, 2015

Last Words by Rich Zahradnik

In March of 1975, as New York City hurtles toward bankruptcy and the Bronx burns, newsman Coleridge Taylor roams police precincts and ERs. In LAST WORDS by Rich Zahradnik, Taylor searches for the story that will deliver him from obits, his place of exile at the Messenger-Telegram. Ever since he was demoted from the police beat for inventing sources, the 34-year-old has been a lost soul. A break comes at Bellevue, where Taylor views the body of a homeless teen picked up in the Meatpacking District. Taylor smells a rat: the dead boy looks too clean and he’s wearing a distinctive Army field jacket. A little digging reveals that the jacket belonged to a hobo named Mark Voichek and that the teen was a spoiled society kid up to no good, the son of a city official. Taylor’s efforts to learn Voichek’s secret put him on the hit list of three goons who are willing to kill any number of street people to cover tracks that just might lead to City Hall. Taylor has only one ally in the newsroom, young and lovely reporter Laura Wheeler. Time is not on his side. If he doesn’t wrap this story up soon, he’ll be back on the obits page—as a headline, not a byline, in Rich Zahradnik’s LAST WORDS.

Q &A with Rich Zahradnik
author of

  • What inspired you to write LAST WORDS?
The story started out as a “what if…?” What if a big-time police reporter were forced to do the dull work of obituaries, always dealing with the dead but never pursuing the why of their deaths.

  • The main character, Coleridge Taylor, mentions music often, are you a fan of the same bands Taylor references? What are your top 3 favorite songs from the 60s and 70s? 

I like most of what Taylor likes, though found out about a lot of the groups later than he did. I was in high school from 1974-78. My group of friends and I thought we were mired in a musical wasteland, disco on the one side and hair bands (Styx, Foreigner, Kansas) on the other. Punk had not reached Poughkeepsie, so I did not become a fan of that music until I reached college, when I discovered the Talking Heads, the Police, and the Ramones. I also became a huge fan of Bruce Springsteen, who was neither punk, nor hair band, just real. My three favorite songs:
  • Thunder Road
  • Pyscho Killer
  • Sweet Jane (with the Intro)

  • Taylor carries a hefty literary name being named after the English Romantic poet Samuel Coleridge. What inspired you to connect Taylor to the English Romantic poet?

Taylor has a poor relationship with his father, an alcoholic English professor. His father gave him that name, and Taylor hates the ornamentation of it. Doesn’t much like his father either. Journalism is pretty much the opposite of poetry. I liked the name for all the contradictions it implies. I’m a huge fan of Morse and really wanted to go the one-last-name-only route, but didn’t want to be too much of copycat. This was my compromise.

  • Taylor works as a journalist in LAST WORDS. What was one of your favorite stories you covered as a journalist?

Covering the Cannes Film Festival. Stars. Glitter. Movies. Business. All wrapped into one two-week long party. At another time, I co-owned a weekly newspaper. Being the news outlet and voice for a community was a real kick, though there were a lot of different stories in there.

  • What makes 1975 so unique? What characteristics and traits define that time period in your perspective?

The year 1975 and the city of New York intrigued me because of the very striking parallels to America today. Then as now, an unpopular war was finally coming to its sad end. A major institution, the city itself, tumbled toward bankruptcy, threatening a cataclysm on the entire financial system. This as banks and ratings agencies ignored the warning signs or willfully misled the public. I chose this time period for the differences as well as the similarities. Solving a mystery in 1975 required good old-fashioned legwork and serious brainwork, rather than science fiction-like instant DNA typing and surveillance video available from any and every angle. Taylor has to find a pay phone when he needs to call someone. There’s something satisfying in that for me. 

You can buy Last Words HERE

By Rich Zahradnik
Camel Press
October 1, 2014; $12.49 paperback; $4.95 Kindle
ISBN- 978-1603812078